Showing posts tagged education

Educational apps are usually flashcard, textbook or calculator substitutes: They make games that help with memorization, are references for information, or give you the answer. What’s exciting about Wolfram Alpha’s new apps is that they sometimes give you not just the answer, but a step-by-step explanation of how they arrived at it. Instead of just spitting out an answer and a line for a one-variable equation, for instance, the Algebra app shows each step of the equation.

Wolfram Alpha Takes on Education With Algebra, Calculus & Music Theory Apps

Educational apps are usually flashcard, textbook or calculator substitutes: They make games that help with memorization, are references for information, or give you the answer. What’s exciting about Wolfram Alpha’s new apps is that they sometimes give you not just the answer, but a step-by-step explanation of how they arrived at it. Instead of just spitting out an answer and a line for a one-variable equation, for instance, the Algebra app shows each step of the equation.

Wolfram Alpha Takes on Education With Algebra, Calculus & Music Theory Apps

Diversity in what?

I’ve been reading a little bit of the Copyright Agency Limited's AGM minutes.

To those that argue that copyright impedes knowledge, we say this: copyright creates diversity. It is an essential component of a democratic society. It should be available to those who want to benefit from its existence, and respected by those who wish to access materials created under its protection.

I can see how schools paying $54.3m to the Copyright Agency Ltd in 08-09 could be considered creating diversity but I would like to know what the schools are paying for. Is it specific educationally designed material? I am wondering if anyone can access these survey results:

Last year surveys were carried out in over 300 educational institutions, including 280 schools, 8 universities, 15 TAFEs and 6 community colleges. Digital use continues to increase in schools…

I hope these results reveal quality, educationally sound resources.

The End of Education Is the Dawn of Learning

Stephen Heppell, one of the world’s leading education reformers, talks about education.

Schools are full of things that our descendants will look back on and laugh out loud at: ringing a bell and expecting 1,000 teenagers to be simultaneously hungry; putting 25 children together in a box because they were born between two Septembers; assessing children based on how well they work alone; and so on.

I found the youtube video “Building Connections Conference evaluations" unnerving at first but listening to their comments was quite insightful.

Wildavsky says that knowledge isn’t a finite resource like gold or diamonds—it’s something that can grow; it is a public good.

Tech Crunh article “The Global Education Race”.

… rather than fearing the globalization of higher education, which will be counterproductive, we should embrace it. As executives in the tech industry know, the best strategy to compete is to hire all stars from wherever you can find them.

An entertaining but relevant look at Tangential Learning and the divide between “edu” games and mainstream video games. Well done to the authors (Daniel Floyd & James Portnow) for recognising that this style of education tends to become a historians utopia (as most of the ‘learning’ tends to quickly descend into historical) and providing some alternate examples… possibly could have explored that a bit more though.

Reading the comments on the youtube page is interesting too as many say what they’ve learned through this approach in current mainstream video games.

A more emotional than statistical look at education. I am reluctant to tag it with infographics but, well, there is some there. It’s strength, as Nathan from FlowingData points out, is in it’s flow and style.

After watching the movie trailer and the premise of the campaign behind it I can see that this animation fits in well with the emotional strings the campaign is trying to pull.

Waiting For ‘Superman’

This is a great trailer for an up and coming documentary directed by ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ Davis Guggenheim, hopefully some poignant truths will be explored. The more discussion about how to improve education the better!

The trailer introduces the very disturbing selection criteria that students lives hang upon; elegantly laying the foundation of what getting a good education has become.